Their votes won’t change who wins this election. So how do people in safe seats make their voices heard?

Home Health Their votes won’t change who wins this election. So how do people in safe seats make their voices heard?
Their votes won’t change who wins this election. So how do people in safe seats make their voices heard?

In the heat of the election campaign, the spotlight is firmly fixed on the marginal seats, where just a few hundred votes could decide the next prime minister.

But as millions of Australians prepare to go to the polls tomorrow, some voters living in safe seats feel overlooked by politicians in their local electorates.

“Definitely they don’t care,” said Munish Bansal, with a laugh.

Mr Bansal, who is caring full-time for his elderly parents who migrated from India, lives in the seat of Scullin in Melbourne’s north.

It is Labor’s safest seat, held by Shadow Multicultural Affairs Minister Andrew Giles with a margin of more than 21 per cent.

Mr Bansal said he heard of politicians in more marginal areas door-knocking or ringing voters to ask about what mattered to them.

“Nobody comes to my home … I never see any activity here,” he said.

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